44 years on, Title IX still expanding

6月 23, 2016

Title IX of the Civil Rights Act, which guarantees equal opportunities for women and girls in all federally funded programs, was signed into law 44 years ago today. It is most often associated with the fight for gender equity in college athletics, but its impact has been felt across the spectrum from education access to employment.

Title IX opened a wide range of fields once hostile or closed to women, and lawyers at LAS-ELC have been invoking it to improve girls’ access to sports programs and facilities run by K-12 schools and park and recreation departments across California.

We’re celebrating the 44th anniversary with two events this week, a brown bag lecture and the launch of a new video on our website.

“The New Enforcement of Title IX: Campus Sexual Assault and Harassment” was the topic of the fourth installment in the Elizabeth J. Cabraser Summer Lecture Series on June 21. The panelists touched on the controversial sentencing of Brock Turner in a violent sexual assault at Stanford, and they called for a “Title IX Summit,” mentioning that many of the newly mandated Title IX coordinators on K-12 and college campuses statewide lack the background or skills they need to handle sexual assault cases. (Find the complete stream here on our Facebook page.)

Our new video, “Understanding the Fair Play Act (AB 2404) – Equity for Girls in Sports,” can be found here, or on our Fair Play program’s website page.

Girls in California enjoy additional protections under AB 2404, the Fair Play in Community Sports Act, which passed in 2004 and requires gender equity in community youth athletic programs. LAS-ELC lawyers Elizabeth Kristen and Kim Turner and special counsel Cacilia Kim, who with our co-counsel won the first-ever federal appellate court ruling enforcing Title IX in K-12 schools, are working to apply the state law as well.

“The major issue is, we have this fantastic progressive law in California to ensure girls and boys equally participate and benefit from sports hosted and run by park and rec departments,” says staff attorney Kim Turner. “But very few people know about the law or are exercising their rights under it or implementing the law.”

Our new know-your-rights video is packed with engaging, hands-on tips and features U.S. Women’s National Team member, World Cup Winner and Gold Medalist Briana Scurry, as well as parks and recreation department staff and league heads. It is intended to help a wider audience understand a law that has been in place for more than a decade, barely implemented.

“This training video is the first of its kind on the law and is aimed at getting park and recreation staff up to speed, since they can be the agents of change,” said Turner. “Of course, anyone watching can learn something and start looking around at their park and recreational [facilities] to assess equity and request change. The video helps us cover a lot more territory, ensuring the 500+ park and rec departments in California can finally start down the road to compliance.”[:es]

Title IX of the Civil Rights Act, which guarantees equal opportunities for women and girls in all federally funded programs, was signed into law 44 years ago today. It is most often associated with the fight for gender equity in college athletics, but its impact has been felt across the spectrum from education access to employment.

Title IX opened a wide range of fields once hostile or closed to women, and lawyers at LAS-ELC have been invoking it to improve girls’ access to sports programs and facilities run by K-12 schools and park and recreation departments across California.

We’re celebrating the 44th anniversary with two events this week, a brown bag lecture and the launch of a new video on our website.

“The New Enforcement of Title IX: Campus Sexual Assault and Harassment” was the topic of the fourth installment in the Elizabeth J. Cabraser Summer Lecture Series on June 21. The panelists touched on the controversial sentencing of Brock Turner in a violent sexual assault at Stanford, and they called for a “Title IX Summit,” mentioning that many of the newly mandated Title IX coordinators on K-12 and college campuses statewide lack the background or skills they need to handle sexual assault cases. (Find the complete stream here on our Facebook page.)

Our new video, “Understanding the Fair Play Act (AB 2404) – Equity for Girls in Sports,” can be found here, or on our Fair Play program’s website page.

Girls in California enjoy additional protections under AB 2404, the Fair Play in Community Sports Act, which passed in 2004 and requires gender equity in community youth athletic programs. LAS-ELC lawyers Elizabeth Kristen and Kim Turner and special counsel Cacilia Kim, who with our co-counsel won the first-ever federal appellate court ruling enforcing Title IX in K-12 schools, are working to apply the state law as well.

“The major issue is, we have this fantastic progressive law in California to ensure girls and boys equally participate and benefit from sports hosted and run by park and rec departments,” says staff attorney Kim Turner. “But very few people know about the law or are exercising their rights under it or implementing the law.”

Our new know-your-rights video is packed with engaging, hands-on tips and features U.S. Women’s National Team member, World Cup Winner and Gold Medalist Briana Scurry, as well as parks and recreation department staff and league heads. It is intended to help a wider audience understand a law that has been in place for more than a decade, barely implemented.

“This training video is the first of its kind on the law and is aimed at getting park and recreation staff up to speed, since they can be the agents of change,” said Turner. “Of course, anyone watching can learn something and start looking around at their park and recreational [facilities] to assess equity and request change. The video helps us cover a lot more territory, ensuring the 500+ park and rec departments in California can finally start down the road to compliance.”

[:zh]

Title IX of the Civil Rights Act, which guarantees equal opportunities for women and girls in all federally funded programs, was signed into law 44 years ago today. It is most often associated with the fight for gender equity in college athletics, but its impact has been felt across the spectrum from education access to employment.

Title IX opened a wide range of fields once hostile or closed to women, and lawyers at LAS-ELC have been invoking it to improve girls’ access to sports programs and facilities run by K-12 schools and park and recreation departments across California.

We’re celebrating the 44th anniversary with two events this week, a brown bag lecture and the launch of a new video on our website.

“The New Enforcement of Title IX: Campus Sexual Assault and Harassment” was the topic of the fourth installment in the Elizabeth J. Cabraser Summer Lecture Series on June 21. The panelists touched on the controversial sentencing of Brock Turner in a violent sexual assault at Stanford, and they called for a “Title IX Summit,” mentioning that many of the newly mandated Title IX coordinators on K-12 and college campuses statewide lack the background or skills they need to handle sexual assault cases. (Find the complete stream here on our Facebook page.)

Our new video, “Understanding the Fair Play Act (AB 2404) – Equity for Girls in Sports,” can be found here, or on our Fair Play program’s website page.

Girls in California enjoy additional protections under AB 2404, the Fair Play in Community Sports Act, which passed in 2004 and requires gender equity in community youth athletic programs. LAS-ELC lawyers Elizabeth Kristen and Kim Turner and special counsel Cacilia Kim, who with our co-counsel won the first-ever federal appellate court ruling enforcing Title IX in K-12 schools, are working to apply the state law as well.

“The major issue is, we have this fantastic progressive law in California to ensure girls and boys equally participate and benefit from sports hosted and run by park and rec departments,” says staff attorney Kim Turner. “But very few people know about the law or are exercising their rights under it or implementing the law.”

Our new know-your-rights video is packed with engaging, hands-on tips and features U.S. Women’s National Team member, World Cup Winner and Gold Medalist Briana Scurry, as well as parks and recreation department staff and league heads. It is intended to help a wider audience understand a law that has been in place for more than a decade, barely implemented.

“This training video is the first of its kind on the law and is aimed at getting park and recreation staff up to speed, since they can be the agents of change,” said Turner. “Of course, anyone watching can learn something and start looking around at their park and recreational [facilities] to assess equity and request change. The video helps us cover a lot more territory, ensuring the 500+ park and rec departments in California can finally start down the road to compliance.”

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