In The Media

“No Indians”: LAAW’s Complaint against a Bay Area solar company that refused to work with customers of “Indian or Middle Eastern” descent was covered in the San Jose Mercury News

Legal Aid at Work and co-counsel Beth Mora's lawsuit against a San Leandro solar company that refused to work with customers of "Indian or Middle Eastern" descent was covered in the San Jose Mercury News. The story also discusses a parallel lawsuit against the company being brought by the EEOC regarding the same conduct.
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The New York Times Discusses LAAW’s Partnership with the TIME’S UP Legal Defense Fund to Combat Sex Harassment

The New York Times quotes attorney Katie Wutchiett regarding LAAW's partnership with the TIME'S UP Legal Defense Fund to end sexual harassment of low-wage workers.
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The San Francisco Chronicle Profiles LAAW’s Successful Efforts to Fight Wage Theft at High-Profile Bay Area Restaurants

The Gordo Taqueria case described in the article is one of several cases LAAW brought against high-profile restaurants in the Bay Area to raise awareness about the all-too-common problem of wage theft in the restaurant industry there, and to galvanize efforts to end it. The $690,000 settlement ensures that class members will get, on average, $2000, and over 40 workers will receive more than $5,000.
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ABC 7 News Covers Sex Harassment Suit Against the Post Office for Employing Serial Harasser

ABC 7 News in San Francisco covered a sex harassment lawsuit brought by LAAW and co-counsel Wendy Musell against the Postal Service for employing a serial sex harasser in Daly City.
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SF Chronicle Discusses LAAW’s $1M Victory for Dairy Worker in Retaliation Case

The San Francisco Chronicle reported on LAAW and CRLA's $1M settlement in a case that protects countless workers from retaliation. "The case ensures that employers can’t game the system by cheating employees and then turning around and threatening to have the employees deported when they stand up for their basic rights,' said Legal Aid at Work attorney Christopher Ho."
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LAAW’s Title IX Lawsuit Seeking Gender Equity for Girls in Hawaii featured in the Honolulu Star-Advertiser

LAAW and co-counsel's  federal civil rights lawsuit claiming unequal treatment of girls’ athletic programs was featured in the Honolulu Star-Advertiser.  
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Elizabeth Kristen Speaks to Television Industry Leaders About Depictions of Military Sexual Assualt

Elizabeth Kristen spoke to leaders in the television industry in Los Angeles about military sexual trauma, its depiction in television and movies, and how it impacts veterans and servicemembers and their return to civilian life, including work. The event was written up in Variety.
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Our Appellate Win on Behalf of Immigrant Workers Featured the SF Chronicle

Our appellate victory today in the California Court of Appeals was featured in the San Francisco Chronicle. We’re challenging the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation’s practice of screening out applicants for employment based on prior use of an invalid social security number (without conducting an individualized assessment as to the employee’s fitness for employment), arguing that this practice had a disparate impact on Latinos in violation of applicable civil rights laws. This is an important case for workers who may have used someone else’s social security number in the past for reasons that do not affect their current eligibility for employment—as often happens with individuals (like DREAMers) who came to this country as undocumented minors and who later obtained an immigration status that allows them to work.
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The Nation Discusses LAAW’s Efforts to End Courthouse Immigration Arrests

An article in The Nation discusses (and links to) our proposed statewide rule that would ban courthouse immigration arrests: "Immigrant-rights defenders have petitioned the Judicial Council of California to institute a new rule to prevent ICE intervention [in courthouses]. . ."'In addition to having a chilling effect, it makes it really difficult if not impossible to have meaningful access to due process in the courts.'" (quoting Grisel Ruiz of the Immigrant Legal Resource Center)
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