In The Media

Forbes Highlights the story of LAAW’s Client Laura Zuniga on the 5th Anniversary of #MeToo

Ms. Zuniga filed a lawsuit after her co-driver sexually assaulted her. “I feel like I need to speak up for myself, and for my daughters, and show them we have to fight so this doesn’t keep happening to other women.”
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The New York Times Features LAAW’s Case Against Campbell HS Seeking Gender Equity for Student Athletes in Hawai’i

The Article, which features quotes from LAAW’s Elizabeth Kristen, discusses how these girls had to “had to practice in the ocean, battling fickle winds and choppy waves because their high school had failed to provide them a pool.”
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Katherine Wutchiett Shares How to Take Family Leave and What to Do When You Come Back to Work

"Employers don't always have it 100% right," said Katherine Wutchiett. Katherine also notes, "Once you want to make use of those protections you need to tell your employer so that you can trigger their obligation to provide those to you."
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Impact Fund Highlights Case Where Hawaiian High School Female Athletes Won Title IX Claims Against the Hawaii State DOE and the Oahu Interscholastic Association

In the article, Impact Fund highlights a recent case won by Legal Aid at Work's Elizabeth Kristen and Emma Steiner, where female athletes from James Campbell High School in Hawai'i were retaliated against by the Hawai'i Department of Education (DOE) for flagging concerns on gender discrimination. The female athletes were able to win class certification to pursue Title IX claims against both the Hawai'i Department of Education and the Oahu Interscholastic Association (“OIA”).
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Katherine Wutchiett Speaks CalMatters About How SB 951 Makes Paid Family Leave More Accessible to Workers with Low Incomes

Katherine Wutchiett said, "Until now, workers who couldn’t afford a 40% pay cut were being forced to keep working against their doctor’s orders, to work up until the day they go into labor, to leave ill family members without adequate care, and to return to work right after having a child. SB 951 finally ends this inhumane status quo.”
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Governor Newsom Signs New Law That Will Increase Paid Family Leave Benefits

Twenty years after California became the first state to offer paid family leave, Governor Newsom signed SB 951 into law to increase benefits, covering families that need to take time off work to bond with a new child or care for a sick family member.
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Richmond Confidential Highlights How SB 951 Can Make an Impact on Richmond Families

In the article, Katherine Wutchiett said, "If people can get 90% of their income, that will take us a huge step towards making sure that if people are sick, they feel like they can take time off to recover, or if they have family members who need support, that they can be there without having to balance out what impact it will have on their ability to pay rent or buy food or take care of basic expenses."
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Marisa Díaz Discusses the Need for DHS to Create Guidelines to Protect Immigrants Who Assert Their Workplace Rights

The article highlights a letter, signed by five members of the U.S. House of Representatives, urging DHS Secretary Alejandro Majorkas to establish a process to provide protections and work authorization for workers who stand up to assert their workplace rights. Marisa Díaz said, "For workers to take the risk to step forward and make that request to DHS, they need to have confidence that DHS has a policy in place and will consider granting these protections."
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Fresno Bee Highlights Undocumented Workers and Allies that Organized Statewide Caravan to Urge Gov. Newsom to Extend Unemployment Benefits to All

As many bills are awaiting Governor Newsom's veto or approval, undocumented workers and allies, including the SafetyNet4All Coalition, which we're a part of, organized a two-day statewide caravan to pressure him to sign a bill that would extend unemployment benefits to all Californians. Millions of undocumented workers are ineligible for unemployment benefits due to their immigration status, despite contributing to billions in state and local tax revenues.
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